book reviews

Book Review: Snobbity Snowman – Maria Bardyukova & Quiet Riley

Good morning everybody!

My first review request of the month and 2018 gives me the opportunity to look back at the type of books I would have been reading as a child.

Back in my day – so, so long ago (joking!) the most memorable series of books that springs to mind was The Magic Key series! Weren’t they fun?! Well, I thought they were, and being encouraged to read from such a young age, I wouldn’t be surprised if I read all of them. I think all children should be encouraged to read – not only is it an essential skill, but for us bookworms, it is a pleasure as well.

Snobbity Snowman

Goodreads – Snobbity Snowman

Snobbity Snowman has everything a snowman could possibly want: a shiny hat, freshly-picked noses and enough pride to last a lifetime. In fact, he is so selfish and shortsighted that he fails to see the instance his life starts falling apart.

What disasters must take place to open his charcoal eyes? To help him see that pride and possessions cannot bring true happiness? Will he defrost his ego and embrace the warmth of companionship?

Only Snobbity can tell.

Depicting winter in rich and whimsical tones, Snobbity Snowman’s quirky characters and unexpected twists promise to leave a lasting impression on all its snobbulous readers.

Snobbity Snowman really captures the essence of Christmas. It is easy to become caught up in the presents, the food and the inevitable cost. Who got the better present, and who had the most moey spent on them? It is a selfish side of Christmas, and sometimes it can feel like it has turned into a competition. How many small children have internet capable smartphones nowadays?! I think it’s ludicrous – I got my first Nokia brick (with everyone’s favourite game of snake on it) when I was about nine or ten, I think, but it was only for emergencies.

Anyway, I’m getting side-tracked. My point is, the focus of Christmas is no longer about giving, or more importantly appreciating what you have – family. The current social attitude is symbolised by Snobbity Snowman; he has anything he could “possibly ever want”, and anything less than satisfactory makes him angry.

Only when he is stripped of his possessions (and associated pride) does he open his eyes to such meagre items making the world of difference to the family that acquired them. In that, he finds happiness himself. To give is the best thing that you can do. Once he has learned this he is made new again and becomes part of the family.

The message behind Snobbity Snowman is an important one for children to learn, and this has been carefully portrayed. Also expected within books aimed at this audience are gradual introductions to new words – roiled and rancorous, for example. Alliteration is also a device used in the book to draw the reader to these words, to make them fun, yet prominent.

Bearing the target audience in mind, probably the most contributing factor to the book and the audience’s understanding of the story are the illustrations accompanying the text. Snobbity is portrayed perfectly; the vivid images help move the story along and throw in some humour along the way!

All in all, this is a lovely book to read with the kids, to introduce them to new words and ideas and more importantly, to convey the message that material possessions are not what is important, but family and happiness.

Thank you to Quiet Riley for approaching me with the request to read this book in an exchange for a review.

Rebecca mono

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